Lecturer in Modern Languages (German)

Alex Lloyd

Alex Lloyd

Teaching

I teach German language and literature from the mid-eighteenth to the twenty-first century, in particular post-1945 literature and film. Modern prescribed authors and filmmakers on whom I offer undergraduate teaching include Thomas Mann, Günter Grass, Christa Wolf, and Christian Petzold. In the Faculty, my recent lectures include series on post-1990 literature and film, women’s writing, and cultural memory. At graduate level, I have taught a special subject (Literature and Visual Culture after 1900) for the Mst in Modern Languages and I act as a college advisor for students in the Humanities. In June 2019, I received a Teaching Excellence Award from the University’s Humanities Division.

For a number of years I was part of the team which runs the Oxford German Network, an initiative of the German department of the Faculty of Medieval and Modern Languages dedicated to cross-cultural cooperation between schools, cultural organisations, businesses, and policy-makers.

Research

My main research interests are in twentieth-century German culture, particularly the depiction of children and childhood, and engagements with the history and memory of war and dictatorship. I have published widely on post-war German literature and film, and recently finished my first book, Childhood, Memory, and the Nation: Young Lives under Nazism in Contemporary German Culture (2020). I currently run a project on the White Rose resistance, a group of students and a professor who secretly wrote and distributed anti-Nazi pamphlets in the early 1940s. Since June 2019, I have held a Knowledge Exchange Fellowship at the Oxford Research Centre in the Humanities (TORCH). I have been working with the Munich-based White Rose Foundation (Weiße Rose Stiftung) to raise awareness of the history and legacy of the White Rose, contextualising them in a much larger story about the power of the written word, and how culture can inform political action. For more information, please visit the project website.

As both a singer and a linguist, I am also interested in the relationship between language, translation, and music. I am the co-convener of a research network exploring the interaction of music and words in the nineteenth- and twentieth-century European song tradition, the Oxford Song Network. I have devised translation workshops with undergraduates, exploring theories of vocal translation and the practical aspects of adapting texts for performance. In 2014 I worked with students on translations of German songs from World War I as part of a college commemoration event.

Selected Publications

Childhood, Memory, and the Nation: Young Lives under Nazism in Contemporary German Culture (Cambridge: Legenda, 2020)

‘Emotional History and Legacies of War in Recent German Comics and Graphic Novels’, in Documenting Trauma in Comics: Traumatic Pasts, Embodied Histories, and Graphic Reportage, ed. by Dominic Davies and Candida Rifkind (Basingstoke, UK: Palgrave Macmillan, 2020), pp. 49-67

The White Rose: Reading, Writing, Resistance, ed. and introduction by Alexandra Lloyd (Oxford: Taylor Institution Library, 2019)

Yoko Tawada in Dialogue, co-edited with Christoph Held and Henrike Lähnemann (Oxford: Taylor Institution Library, 2018)

Afterimages of a Saint: Felicitas Hoppe’s Johanna and the Poetics of Writing History’, Journal of Romance Studies, 18 (2018), 341-56

Wir wollten doch wissen, wie groß die Gefahr war: The German War Child as Icon and Agent in Berlin School Essays, 1946’, The War Child in the Occupation Period (1945-9), ed. by Beate Müller, Debbie Pinfold, Ute Wölfel, special issue of German Life and Letters, 69 (2016), 437-52

Songs of Innocence and Experience:’ Michael Haneke’s Cinematic Visions of Childhood’, Modern Language Review, 111 (2016), 183-207

Childhood in German Film after 1989, co-edited with Ute Wölfel, special issue of Oxford German Studies, 44 (2015)

Rescreening Erich Kästner after the Wall: Adaptations in the Berlin Republic’, Childhood in German Film after 1989, ed. by Alexandra Lloyd and Ute Wölfel, special issue of Oxford German Studies, 44 (2015), 289-310

Dolls and Play: Material Culture and Memories of Girlhood in Germany, 1933-1945’, in Dolls Studies: The Many Meanings of Girls’ Toys and Play, ed. by Miriam Forman-Brunell and Jennifer Whitney (New York: Peter Lang, 2015), pp. 37-63

Institutionalized Stories: Childhood and National Socialism in Contemporary German Museum Displays’, Post-War Literature and Institutions, ed. by Seán M. Williams and W. Daniel Wilson, special issue of Oxford German Studies, 43 (2014), 89-105

Writing Childhood in Ruth Klüger’s weiter leben: Eine Jugend’, Forum for Modern Language Studies, 49 (2013), 175-83

Subjects
Modern Languages and Linguistics
Dr Lloyd
alexandra.lloyd@mod-langs.ox.ac.uk

The story of the White Rose is best told when the individuals involved speak for themselves, in their letters, diaries, and pamphlets, and not when they are idealized or mythologized.